Why Medicaid Is So Important to Those with Cerebral Palsy

Why Medicaid Is So Important to Those with Cerebral Palsy


Medicaid is at the forefront of people’s minds who have disabilities or are the parents of children with disabilities. Changes are happening to our healthcare system that hopefully will improve our citizens’ health and the economy overall. But some people might be confused as to why Medicaid is so important to people who have disabilities, and how cuts to it would be harmful to the health and quality of life of those who need it.

The problem with Medicaid is that often many people receive services when they do not need it. When people scam the system, they make it more difficult for those who truly need the system to be able to benefit from it. I do not believe that people in government are trying to hurt people who have disabilities. They are trying to save a failing system, so it is in place for those who need it for years to come.

I have mixed cerebral palsy, which means that my muscles can either be very cooperative or not cooperative at all. Independently, I can get in and out of bed, change some outfits, and get around my house. Other than that, I need assistance to eat, brush my hair and teeth, get in my wheelchair, put on my shoes, and use the bathroom. My husband is a big support in helping me, but he has to go to work, and I prefer to maintain my own independence from his.

Medicaid allows people who have significant disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, to maintain independence. Medicaid will pay for people to come into your home to help provide physical assistance. Without personal care attendants, I would probably still be living with my parents or in a nursing care facility. Young people who have disabilities do not belong in a nursing home.

Medicaid provides for all of these services. Now, let’s think for a minute and take Medicaid away. What would happen? Many family members might lose their jobs because they need to care for their family member with a disability. People with disabilities will go without care, or quality care, and end up being unhealthy or sick, lose their own jobs, and have shorter life spans. Nursing homes will be flooded to capacity with people with physical disabilities needing care, which nursing homes aren’t properly equipped or trained for. The government will, in turn, need to spend more money in nursing facilities than ever before.

Most people who have disabilities would most likely agree that we need to take people off of Medicaid who really do not deserve to have it. America only has so much money to go around and needs to aid those who depend on having services. However, please be careful and think about all of those who are in need. Think about all of the employment opportunities given to personal care attendants on a daily basis. More jobs will definitely boost the economy. Just be careful in your decisions and look at all of the angles.

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Note: Cerebral Palsy News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Cerebral Palsy News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to cerebral palsy.

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Jessica Grono is an educator, speaker and writer. Jessica has a degree in Education. She is a wife and mother of two children. Jessica has several blogs because she enjoys educating people on breast cancer, cerebral palsy, parenting and general knowledge. Jessica is former Ms. Wheelchair Pennsylvania. Check out her web site at http://jessgrono.com

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